Question about 1996 Ford Explorer

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My Ford Explorer wont start

The battery has 10 volts according to my voltage meter. Shouldn't that be enough to crank the engine?

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  • Ford Master
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Need good 12 volts 11 volts starter turn engine over slow then starter solenoid start clicking.the pull in and hold in windings in solenoid wont have enough power to hold in engage starter drive pinion.have battery charged and load tested.make alternator keeping battery charged.if battery over 5 years old time to replace.

Posted on Jan 15, 2013

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  • Expert
  • 165 Answers

Check ur injectector fuse under the hood in the engine comartment

Posted on Jan 14, 2013

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  • Contributor
  • 18 Answers

No, that's to weak. I'm afraid you most likely have a bad cell in the battery, which will require it's replacement. Keep in mind it's current, not voltage that spins your starter and with your battery producing significantly less voltage than it should, your not getting enough current to operate the starter. Sorry for the bad news..
One way to confirm this is to use some jumper cables to connect the battery from a friends running car to your battery. It should start, or at least spin the starter if your battery is the problem. Be sure to connect the cable from the negative terminal of your friends vehicle to a good ground on your vehicle, but not the negative terminal of your battery.

Posted on Jan 14, 2013

Testimonial: "Thank you! Why, when using jumper cables, is it recommended not to use the negative terminal of the battery when using jumper cables? I've always wondered this and I'm hoping you can explain it to me. Thanks!"

  •  Les Boomgaarden
    Les Boomgaarden Jan 15, 2013

    To illiminate sparking at the battery, and to removes the old battery from play.

  • Jose Ruppenschlager
    Jose Ruppenschlager Jan 18, 2013

    I see. Thanks!

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6 Suggested Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Anonymous

  • 235 Answers

SOURCE: Fuel pump not working properly getting gas to engine.

change the fuel pump relay.

Posted on Jan 15, 2009

Anonymous

  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: 1989 Ford F150 idles rough after start and stalls out some

i have a 1991 f-150 and had the same problem try changing the fuel filter and put gas treatment in the tank alone with fuel injector cleaner if that doesnt work you mite check the fuel pump and see if any rust or dirt is in the tank cloging things up

Posted on Apr 15, 2009

Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: MY FORD EXPLORER WONT START

fuel pump relay

Posted on Dec 17, 2008

BRIAN NYATOME

  • 132 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 ford explorer sport trac wont start all the function turn on

check what the diagnosis machine will give if there is no data then check if the starter crank sensor is getting any power

Posted on Jul 26, 2010

cansmo

Reynaldo Andico

  • 2431 Answers

SOURCE: 1998 Ford Explorer, 4.0 SOHC No

You are at thhe right trail what controls spark is coil pack crank sensor sparkplugs and plug wire but the most important is power . I mean 12 volt connections and ground This includes checking fuses you need a simple volt meter doesnt have to expensive or fancy just to pick up 12 volts let start with fuses in the engine juction box (there not mark to what it belongs to) make sure none are open. especially fuse 19 and 24 , next go to the crank sensor make sure the tabs are snuggly on now to the coil pack there is a red and light green wire this comes from ignition and feeds 12 volts at the coil pack measure that voltage is it 12 volts if not correct it this is from ignition switch ( you can make a tool that feed 12 volt with a wire and a fuse in series and attatch it to battery and the primary wire this is known as hot wire) next go to the ECM wiggle the wires see if that get a connection going if not go back to the ICM here are the wire you are to measure the tan light green, this is from ECM and it is pulsed it measure 5vlts to 0 volts switched then measure the tan orange the same thing 5 volts to zero,then tan white again 5vlts to zero. any one of these 5 to zero fails you fix is the ecm

Posted on Aug 21, 2011

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1 Answer

Car wont start unless I boost it checked battery and it reads 12.43 on multi meter and checked when I boosted it and went up to 14on meter


A healthy battery reading 12.43 should still be capable of cranking an engine fast enough with enough current left over for the fuel and sparks to start - that is assuming the spark plugs, etc. are also in good condition.

An off-load reading of 12.43 means little on it's own and is only one of a number of tests used to determine battery state. The most important test is to measure the battery voltage while the engine is cranking. It is reckoned a healthy battery attached to a healthy engine, starter, ignition system, etc. will ideally read no less than 12 volts - an analogue meter is best for this test.

12 volts is rather optimistic even for a serviceable system. 10 volts is more realistic and some engines will happily start at 9 volts as long as the cranking speed is still good but any lower and either the battery is in a too-low state of charge, is faulty or the starter motor is taking too much current and needs servicing.

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Tip

12 volt battery test


I have seen many times a 12 volt car battery pass the diagnostic test performed at a repair shop but still fail while being used in the car.
A simple test to do at home is the cranking amps test. Place your 12 volt meter on the battery and check for 12 volts. Then looking at the meter crank the car over. If the voltage drops to 10 volts with all accessories off then the batteries cranking storage amps is weak. A bad scenerio would be the battery drops to below 9 volts. Below 9.6 volts there is not enough electricty to provide good spark to fire the engine.

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If you put a volt meter on the battery and it reads 12 volts before you cranked the engine and it drops to 10 volts or less when you crank the engine, this indicates you have a bad cell in the battery and you should replace the battery because it is not holding the charge. The loud click sound coming from your starter is because you are not supplying enough voltage to energize it.

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Hello. Install amp meter on the battery main feed. One the amp meter is coupled by direct or induced coupling. Start remove the fuses and watch the amp meter and when the amp meter indicator drops that one of the circuit that have some shorted or running. Now they can be more than one circuit that is operating when it shouldn't.

First thing with the amp meter connect disconnect the alternator. Do get wrong here. It a percaution if you happen to concur a large short. Also, when disconnecting the alternator look at the amp meter to see if there is a drop in current being used.

An alternator is a three phase AC generator. There are 6 to 8 high current diodes hook up where it turn the three phase AC voltage to DC voltage half wave + side of the AC. Then this DC voltage being combined voltages goes to a regulator which smooth out the voltage to 13.8 volts approx. The 13.8 DC voltage is need to recharge the battery. Because the vehicle operates on 12 voltage system it uses the battery for the constant voltages of 12 volts and a story house of current. stewbison

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My 1997 jeep grand cherokee tsi with a 5.2 seems to have a charging problem. the alternator is a year old and was tested twice in the last week at 2 different locations and was shown to be good. same thing...


How is the pigtail ground strap from engine block to body? Have you had engine diagnostic test done? Voltage rVOLTAGE DROP TEST
A voltage drop test is the only effective way to find excessive resistance in high amperage circuits. It's a quick and easy test that doesn't require any disassembly and will quickly show you whether or not you've got a good connection or a bad one.
To do a voltage drop test, you create a load in the circuit that's being tested. Then you use a digital volt meter (DVM) to measure the voltage drop across the live connection while it is under the load. Voltage always follows the path of least resistance, so if the circuit or connection being tested has too much resistance some of the voltage will flow through the DVM and create a voltage reading.
voltage_drop.jpg

If a connection is good, you should find little or no voltage drop and see less than 0.4 volts for most connections, and ideally less than 0.1 volts. But if you find more than a few tenths of a voltage drop across a connection, it indicates excessive resistance and a need for cleaning or repair.
CHECKING THE STARTER CIRCUIT
To check the starter circuit for excessive resistance, you need to measure the voltage drop at the battery, battery cable connections and starter while the engine is being cranked.
The first check is "available battery voltage." For the starter to crank at normal speed, the battery must be at least 75% charged (12.4 volts or higher). Low battery voltage can not only affect the starter but every other electrical system in the vehicle.
A. Set your DVM to the 20 volt scale, then connect meter positive (+) lead to battery positive (+) post (not the clamp or cable), and the meter negative (-) lead to battery negative (-) post.
B. Disable the engine so it will not start when it is cranked. (Ground the ignition coil wire, or disable the ignition circuit or fuel pump relay.) Limit cranking time to 15 seconds or less.
C. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading on the DVM. D. Next, connect your meter positive (+) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter, and the meter negative (-) lead to the starter housing.
E. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading.
F. Compare the two voltage readings. If both are the same, there are no excessive voltage drops on the positive feed side.
G. If available voltage at the starter is not within one (1) volt of battery voltage, there is excessive voltage drop in the circuit.
The next test is for voltage drop on the positive side of the starter circuit.
A. Make sure the battery is fully charged.
B. Disable ignition.
C. Set DVM on 2 volt scale.
D. Connect meter positive (+) lead to positive (+) battery post, and the meter negative (-) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter. While cranking the engine, record the voltage reading.
The maximum allowable voltage drop including the solenoid or external relay in the starter circuit should be 0.6 volts or less.
If you find more than a 0.6 volt drop in the starter circuit, you can isolate the bad connection by using the following voltage drop tests.
* Check the positive battery post and cable connection by measuring the voltage drop between the two while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the battery post and the meter negative lead to the cable clamp. A good post/cable connection should have zero voltage drop.
* Check the positive battery cable by measuring the voltage drop end to end while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the clamp on the positive battery cable, and the meter negative lead to the end of the cable at the starter. Crank the engine and note the voltage reading. A good cable should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
* To check the starter solenoid or relay connections, connect the meter positive lead to positive battery terminal on the solenoid or relay, and the meter negative lead to the starter motor terminal. Crank the engine and note the reading. A good connection should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
Next, you need to check the negative side of the starter circuit. To check the entire circuit, connect the meter positive lead to a clean spot on the starter motor case and the meter negative lead to the negative battery post. Crank the engine and note the reading. The voltage drop on the negative side should be 0.3 volts or less.
If the voltage drop is too high, set your DVM to the 2 volt scale and start checking each connection on the negative side to find the bad connection or cable. Use the DVM leads to check across each connection while cranking the engine as before.
Check the negative battery post/ground cable connection (should be zero voltage drop).
Check the negative ground cable from the battery to the engine (should be 0.2 volts or less).
Check between the negative battery post and starter housing (should be 0.3 volts or less).
Check between the engine block and starter housing (should be 0.10 volts or less).
CHECKING THE CHARGING CIRCUIT
To check the alternator connections on the positive side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect the meter positive lead to the alternator output stud (B+ terminal).
C. Connect the meter negative lead to the positive (+) battery post.
D. With the engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except the rear electric defroster), check the voltage drop reading. It should be 0.5 volts or less. If higher, the connections between the alternator output stud and battery need to be cleaned. Also, look for loose connections or undersized cables.
To check the alternator connections on the negative side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect meter negative lead to alternator case.
C. Connect meter positive lead to battery negative (-) post.
D. With engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except rear defogger), check the voltage drop reading. On the negative side, it should be 0.2 volts or less. If excessive, the connections need cleaning or the negative cable needs to be replaced. Some alternators are mounted in rubber bushings and have a separate ground strap. If so equipped, be sure to check the voltage drop across this strap, too.

egulator checked with voltmeter?

Nov 15, 2009 | 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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