20 Most Recent 1981 Suzuki GS 650 G Katana Questions & Answers


Hi, Mtilstra and the usual suspects are:
1. Fuel cap or fuel tank is not venting properly.
2. Fuel filter clogged.
3. Fuel line pinched or kinked.
4. Vacuum line from the petcock to intake manifold cracked.
5. Float needle and seat sticking.
6. Float level too low.
7. Carburetor bowl vent line clogged/blocked/pinched.
8. Idle adjusting screw set too low.
9. Air/fuel mixture screw set too lean.
10. Idle port, transfer ports, slow air jet clogged.
11. Slow fuel jet clogged.
12. Faulty fuel pump.
13. Faulty auto choke or wiring connection.
For more information about your issue and valuable "Free" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
https://www.reddit.com/r/Fixxit/comments/2fd5ae/1982_suzuki_gs650g_starts_with_choke_wide_open
Oakys Garage Carb clean Pilot Jet clogged Won run without Choke Carbs 101
http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/mtsac/~cliff/storage/gs/GS650GManual.pdf
https://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-suzuki
http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/mtsac/~cliff/storage/gs/1982_Suzuki_GS650G_Owners_Manual.pdf

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Apr 22, 2019


Hi, Anonymous for this scenario you will need your service manual, parts fiche, and owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Suzuki, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
https://www.google.com/search?q=1981+Suzuki+GS+650+G+Katana+how+to+replace+the+timing+belt&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiU2531xdjgAhXRtlkKHRMbBR4QsAR6BAgEEAE&biw=1440&bih=757
Sneaky motorcycle cam chain replacement technic how to Davidsfarmison...
http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/mtsac/~cliff/storage/gs/GS650GManual.pdf
https://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-suzuki
http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/mtsac/~cliff/storage/gs/1982_Suzuki_GS650G_Owners_Manual.pdf

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Feb 26, 2019


Hi, Sandrahahn for this scenario you will need your service manual, parts fiche, and owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Suzuki, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Parts Specifications SUZUKI GS 650 KATANA Louis Motorcycle Leisure
https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/suzu/suzuki_gs650g%2081.htm
http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/mtsac/~cliff/storage/gs/GS650GManual.pdf
https://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-suzuki
http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/mtsac/~cliff/storage/gs/1982_Suzuki_GS650G_Owners_Manual.pdf

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Feb 26, 2019


Hi, Anonymous you turn on the ignition switch press the starter button and all you get is the dreaded "CLICK" or "CLUNK" now before testing any electrical component in the Starter System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead-acid batteries. Depending on battery voltage starter relays and starter solenoids can make the same noise when you hit the starter button. You can easily determine which one is at fault by the following two simple tests:
STARTER RELAY- place your thumb and index finger on the starter relay and press the starter button, if you feel the click then the relay is faulty and needs to be replaced.
STARTER SOLENOID- bridge the positive and negative poles of the solenoid with a small screwdriver if you get a loud clunk then the solenoid needs to be rebuilt or replaced as necessary. If the engine turns over then replace the starter relay otherwise the usual suspects for a faulty starter solenoid are:
1. Battery terminals have loose or corroded connections.
2. Battery cables faulty due corroded or broken internal wiring at the cable connector especially the "NEGATIVE" cable which needs to be checked at "BOTH" ends.
3. Battery voltage, must be 12.5 volts or better, voltage from the battery to the main circuit breaker to the ignition switch to the security/ignition fuse to the TSM/TSSM module to the engine stop/run switch to the starter button to the starter relay to the green wire that connects to the starter solenoid must not drop more than 1/2 volt of battery voltage.
4. Disconnect spark plug cables, with a voltmeter connected to the battery, the ignition switch in the on position, the kill switch in the run position, the starter button depressed, starter engagement should not bring voltage below 9.6 volts DC. If the voltage is below 9.6 the battery is faulty and must be replaced. I "HIGHLY" recommend a maintenance free AGM battery typically they have more amperage for cranking.
5. Faulty starter relay, check continuity.
6. Faulty starter solenoid, check contact plate and shoes for excessive electrical erosion/etching, refurbish as necessary or invert contact plate and use the virgin backside. Check contact shoes for being loose. Replace solenoid if the negative function is still a final outcome.
7. Faulty starter, bench test starter with a 12-volt battery if negative function check, decontaminate and undercut armature commutator segments as necessary, check segments with an ohmmeter probe each one and the segment next to it for shorts. Have the armature tested with a growler and field coils, and brush plate with an ohm-meter for opens, shorts or grounds. Replace brushes if less than .438" It is generally cheaper to overhaul/refurbish a starter motor than buying a new one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
https://www.reddit.com/r/Fixxit/comments/2aoavr/1980_gs550e_starting_problems_clicking_noise
What To Do If Your Motorcycle Doesn Start
http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/mtsac/~cliff/storage/gs/GS650GManual.pdf
https://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-suzuki
http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/mtsac/~cliff/storage/gs/1982_Suzuki_GS650G_Owners_Manual.pdf

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Feb 26, 2019


Hi, Anonymous if you have changed your engine size, compression ratio, fuel delivery system, air filter size or flow rate, mufflers or exhaust system or a significant change in altitude your carburetors need re-tuning and if your fuel system (gas tank, filters, fuel valve, and carburetor) is contaminated with ethanol sludge, varnish, rust, dirt, water etc. or your bike has been sitting for months or years without running these components must be "PROPERLY" cleaned and reassembled "CORRECTLY" before any adjustments can be made. Tuning your carburetor is fairly simple once you understand the basic principals. You engine is a simple airbox sucking air in and blowing it out, it is finely tuned at the factory for maximum performance once you upset that delicate balance by changing air filters, camshafts or exhaust systems your performance may go down the and the engine may run poorly, you need to compensate the air-fuel mixture in the carburetor in order for the engine to run smoothly and at peak performance. If you are running multi carburetors you need to sync them first and make sure your air cleaner element is clean and dry for paper elements or lightly oiled for foam and meshed elements and properly installed. Here is how and where you compensate trouble: "TIP" if your engine "BOGS" you're not getting enough fuel.
1. Close to 1/8 throttle is managed by the air screw and pilot/slow jet.
2. 1/8 to 1/4 throttle is managed by the air-screw, pilot/slow jet, and throttle slide.
3. 1/4 to 1/2 throttle is managed by the throttle slide and jet needle.
4. 1/2 to 3/4 throttle is managed by the jet needle, needle jet, main jet, and air jet.
5. 3/4 to wide open throttle is managed by the main jet and air jet.
6. A wide open throttle is managed by the main jet.
If you are running lean, spark plug electrode color is white, engine runs hot and feels like it is starving for fuel you need to go up on the jet size or move the c-clip down one notch. If you are running rich, spark plug color is black or dark gray, the engine runs cool, and bogs down when accelerating you need to go down on jet size or move the c-clip up one notch. When your carburetor is properly tuned for maximum performance your spark plug electrode will be a light tan color like coffee with cream. If you prefer fuel economy over performance you can go down on main jet sizes until a satisfactory level of lower performance is acceptable versus MPH, your spark plug color will be whiter and your engine will run warmer. These tuning adjustments will only make improvements if your intake and exhaust system have no air leaks or sealing issues and the entire electrical system is in proper working order and you have no mechanical issues.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing and printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
https://www.officine08.com/p13663_carburetor-tuning-kit-suzuki-gs-650-e-dynojet-stage-3.html
Motorcycle Mikuni CV Carburetor Cleaning for Suzuki Honda Yamaha Tutorial
http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/mtsac/~cliff/storage/gs/GS650GManual.pdf
https://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-suzuki
http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/mtsac/~cliff/storage/gs/1982_Suzuki_GS650G_Owners_Manual.pdf

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Feb 26, 2019


It is located at the front of the bike just below the h-bar.
Picture of the location

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Sep 20, 2014


tire size front 100/90/19 pressure 1.75 bar
rear tyre 130/90/17 pressure 2.0 bar

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Sep 20, 2014


sounds like a fuel starvation problem, remove fuel tap and check the filter, or worse scenario jets in the carbs are blocked, remedy get the carbs sonic cleaned

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Sep 20, 2014


bike should be upright when checking the amount... use an old standard type oil (10w40 motorcycle oil) never automotive oil, you can in an emergency to try and make it home but thats the only time. i think most oil fill caps are located on the right side of the engine and every bike i"ve ever owned it was plastic and black, some have dipstick like yours probably does, or like the newer models that have a little sight glass. Most all bikes take approx 3 qts oil 3.2 qts if changing with filter..after a full drain and adding i put in 2 bottles without question, then wait about 30 seconds let it settle in everywhere, then i pour in another 1/2 right away...then i take a measurement,..you only want to fill it to 3/4 way up the stick or sight glass this way you get into the practice of never over filling. Once it gets to 3/4 mark, start the engine, let it idle for a minute, then check oil level again. Thats it ...hope this was veryhelpful!

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Apr 14, 2010


hi,i have one of these,great old bike,parts are becoming an issue,but never fear,try"bikebandit.com",they are based in the uk,but ship worldwide,and are very reasonably priced,i am based in new zealand and all parts i order are normally here inside 10 days..hope this helps..cheers

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Mar 16, 2010


Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Go to the site below where you can see a parts diagram for your entire bike. You will select the actual brand, year, model, etc., once you go to the site. Part numbers and prices are also shown. You can order parts from this site. In the event no price is shown on a particular part and/or the notation "Not Available" is in the description, the part is not in stock. www.babbittsonline.com/pages/parts/viewbybrandand/parts.aspx

Look for "Rear swingarm" in the dropdown screen
Please rate my answer. Thanks!

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Nov 30, 2009


yes with a manual in hand the job should take a first timer about 2 hours

If you need further help, I’m available over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/michael_00678fd4800d19c5

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Oct 10, 2009


Whats your question? If asking for directions its pretty straight forward. You remove the fairings then spark plugs and any plugs, I'm pretty sure the tank has to come out on this one then a series of bolts on top of the head to access the gaskets. Make sure you clean any old gasket residue on the head and cover plate without scracthing the head surface to avoid any problems with new one sealing. Then reassemble insuring the gasket sits right and the bolts don't pierce the gasket and being careful not to overtighten the bolts. Its a pretty simple process if your mechanically inclined just take your time and don't rush and you'll be fine..

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Oct 07, 2009


did you drain the gas and put in new? also you need a new fuel filter and you need to be sure you cleaned the carbs completly and put all the air and needles back in the same for each

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Aug 13, 2009


Google " motorcycle salvage suzuki "

1981 Suzuki GS... | Answered on Apr 16, 2009


It isn't very hard to change the plates. You will need an impact driver to loosen screws and the clutch spring bolts and center nut. Normally the only plates that need replaced are the fiber friction plates and not the metal pressure plates. Go to www.babbittsonline.com to see an exploded view of your clutch. Note that the 1st plate and last plate should be a fiber friction plate. Also note that the center nut has a special lock washer. To loosen the nut you must first unbend the spot on the washer that is stopping the nut from turning. tombones49_271.giftombones49_272.gif

Suzuki GS 650 G... | Answered on Sep 01, 2011


Yes it is for air Need to have vent Drill a little hole TRY that MOPAR KENNY

Suzuki GS 650 G... | Answered on May 22, 2011


i would suggest that you put a meter on your ignition switch to see if the voltage is been thrown across the switch then the kill switch make sure its not on ( i know it sounds silly but trust me ive dont it myself) check with meter
just a thought did you check that the battery is fully charged i know its new but some come with hardly any voltage
if all of the above are ok then check the starter relay

Hope this helps

John

Suzuki GS 650 G... | Answered on Apr 11, 2011

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