Microsoft Excel for PC - Page 3 - Answered Questions & Fixed issues


I don't think you can. It's a real resource hog especially if youre using 2010/13. See below.

Excel 2003 is officially limited to 1 Gigabyte (GB) of memory.
This limit appears to be a limit on the working set memory used by the Excel process, which is the memory reported by Windows Task Manager.
Although Excel 2003 has a substantially increased memory capacity, many of the individual specific memory limits listed below have not changed in Excel 2003.

Excel 2007 is limited to 2 Gigabytes of memory for the Excel process under Windows XP/Vista (Windows memory limit).
This 2 Gigabyte limit is a limit on the Virtual Memory address space. Virtual memory used by a process is larger than the working set memory reported by Windows Task Manager, so the amount of useable memory under Excel 2007 is considerably less than twice that of Excel 2003.
Because Excel 2007 (Excel12) also requires more memory to store the indexes to the increased number of rows and columns you may not be able to load larger workbooks under Excel 2007 than was possible under Excel 2003. Memory Fragmentation may also mean that it is difficult to make use of all of the available 2 GB of virtual memory.

Many of the individual memory limits listed below have been removed in Excel 2007.

Excel 2010 is available in 2 versions: 32-bit (2 Gigabytes of virtual memory) and 64-bit (8-Terabytes (which is 8000 Gigabytes of virtual memory)).
The 32-bit version has the same memory limits as Excel 2007, but the 64-bit version, when used with a 64-bit Windows operating system, will have extremely large memory limits.
Note that the different versions of Windows Vista 64-bit and Windows 7 64-bit support differing amounts of RAM.

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Mar 20, 2015 | 130 views


The easiest way is to add a field, name it attendance or something and assign a value of one. Then sum column a / sum column b for average.

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Feb 19, 2015 | 69 views


how can we do vlookup two sheet on excle?

E.g

Sheet1 Sheet2
Class Marks

here there are two types of Sheets.If i want to combiend two sheet via vlookup.could you teach me what should do i for same ASAP.

thaks.

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Jan 06, 2015 | 173 views


You should find what you want here:
http://www.usd.edu/trio/tut/excel/

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Jan 06, 2015 | 135 views


Be sure the Excel format/version you are uploading is what's expected (2003,2007, etc.). Further, your naming convention of the file may not be valid. See your classes uploading specifications and be sure you're file is up to par!

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Jan 06, 2015 | 132 views


Try:
XLSX Repair Kit. The latest corrupt XLSX file repair software featuring a powerful data recovery core and a convenient step-by-step wizard for extra convenience.
For more information: http://www.xlsx.repair/

If doesn't help look for the answer here:http://www.filerepairforum.com/forum/microsoft/microsoft-aa/excel/653-i-get-a-message-that-the-file-is-damaged-or-corrupted

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Dec 02, 2016 | 720 views


Conditional formating should be able to this. But how is your data organized? (Column headers, Row headers etc.)

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Oct 21, 2014 | 105 views


There are 2 types of direct cell references that you can use when you're writing formulas: Relative References & Absolute References.
A Relative Reference is the address of a cell (e.g. A5). When a Relative Reference in a formula is copied from one cell to another, the Reference gets changed automatically. e.g. If you put a formula in cell c5 as A5+1, when you copy this from c5 to c6 the formula A5+1 will automatically change to A6+1.
An Absolute Cell Reference does not change when its copied to another location. As in the example above if the formula in cell C5 is written as $A$5+1, if you copy this formula from C5 to C6 it will remain as $A$5+1 (NOT change to $A$6+1.
The $ sign signifies Absolute, and can be applied to the Row reference, the Column reference, or both Column & Row (as in the example).

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Oct 19, 2014 | 248 views


If it isn't too big of a spreadsheet, you can sort it on the column which has the numbers in it, which will put all the 1's in the top of the stack and you can then select just the cells with 1's in them and Excel will count the number of cells that you currently have selected. The number will show up in the Name Box (above cell A1) as: R2 X C2 (for two rows and one column currently selected). Rows are horizontal and columns are vertical.

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Sep 20, 2014 | 104 views


One way would be to create a colunn C and use the formula: =COUNTIF(B$2:B$200,A2) in cell C2. Then copy the formula down to C200. (assuming you have 200 entries in B...). This will put a "1" next to every number in Column A that has a match in column B. Then you could put a conditional formula in column A that will highlight the cell if the value in column C is equal to 1. Alternatively you could also simply filter for 1's in column C and then manually highlight the cells that show up in A!

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Sep 18, 2014 | 80 views


The Little Green Triangle (LGT) is an indicator to alert you to a potential error in your formula. The LGT doesn't stop you from entering a formula (with or without an error), it's just an alert to check that it's OK. If you're happy with the formula you've entered, then you can just ignore the LGT and carry on.
If it's bugging you, you can turn off background error checking.
Go Tools / Error Checking / Options / and uncheck "Enable background error checking". That will turn off the LGTs.

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Sep 09, 2014 | 71 views


If you have a number in Cell A2 (say 100), and you put the amount of percentage increase or decrease in Cell A3 (say -10%), then put this formula into Cell A4 to calculate the answer:
=A2*(1+A3) , which then shows as the answer (90).

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Sep 08, 2014 | 379 views


Move the column to A. Mark entire sheet and sort ascending. There are more raffined ways to do this, but this is an easy quick fix...

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Sep 07, 2014 | 88 views


Sounds like your issue can be solved readily with a pivot table.
If you give the columns of names a title like "NAME" and the number columns a name like "VALUE". All other columns should contain a unique name.

Then select the entire table, including the labels at the top ensuring that the range extends entirely over the column you need to sum the values of.

In Excel 2013, choose the INSERT menu and select the PIVOT TABLE command.
Insert the Pivot table into a new worksheet.
A new sheet will open with a strange-looking control panel on the right of the window.
Make sure that the box for NAME and VALUE (only) are checked

You will notice that Excel assumes that you want the SUM of the values for each NAME summed. The results are in the leftmost area of the worksheet.

If this works for you, please vote my answer as "helpful".

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Sep 03, 2014 | 120 views


A pro-forma would usually include all the taxes that are payable by the vendor on behalf of the buyer. These are usually state sales taxes, or in some countries, may appear as a value-added tax (VAT) or goods & services tax (GST) applied as a percent markup of the transaction. The taxes included in a pro-forma should be those that apply to the transaction being taxed.

Is it a good? A service? A commodity, a major asset? Are there other fees & charges levied by local government that do not attract sales taxes?

The answer is:
It depends on what you are taxing, and in whose jurisdiction you are levying the tax and what rules apply to the calculation of the tax. Familiarise yourself with your applicable tax legislation.

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Sep 01, 2014 | 126 views


I assume that you are creating a pro-forma for others to use. Very simply, you could offer a cell that asks the user to nominate the applicable tax rate for their tax jurisdiction, or, if you know (or assume the value), place that into a cell then multiply the taxable amount by 1+the tax rate, ie I buy shoes for $4 and have a 10% tax rate. Multiply the price of the shoe by 1.04 and you have the final price, inclusive of taxes.

Usually all fees and charges are applied before the taxes are calculated., but check your local tax rules because some government levied charges may not be taxable.

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Sep 01, 2014 | 105 views


Turning off excel compatibility mode

http://bit.ly/1B8LaJb

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Sep 01, 2014 | 202 views


Select the data range that you want to sort alphabetically.
Ensure that the active cell is in the column with the names you want to sort.
Hit the Sort Tool on the toolbar (its the one with an A, a Z and a down arrow on it - it's probably next to a Funnel)
Your data should now be sorted.

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Aug 31, 2014 | 75 views


use this link to download rupee symbolhttp://posterous.com/getfile/files.posterous.com/foradian/N1tP4q7jagR6ej3v82aOEfG45qQ1QpHspimeQOBh5WePATALQdA9v3DWpnjC/Rupee.ttf

Microsoft Excel... | Answered on Aug 23, 2014 | 307 views

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