Question about Mackie 1604 Vlz3 16 Channel Mixer

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No sound get sound in head set but not though spaeker

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This is not a powered mixer and so you must connect a power amp to the "line level" outputs of the mixer. Other "no output" problems could be related to buss assignments and other signal routing issues. Check for output by connecting "Main Out" left or right to a guitar amp input instead BUT turn all volumes down to zero before conductiong this test as guitar amps are designed for "Microphone" level inputs. Owners and Hookup manuals can be found here...

http://www.mackie.com/products/1604vlz3/

Posted on Nov 01, 2012

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Head set jack broken off in hole


I would unscrew the case to fix it only if it is out of warranty. Take it back to the dealer. Casio gives 3 years or 5 years warranty depending on the country.

Mar 16, 2014 | Casio Privia Px-130 Px130 88 Key Digital...

Tip

Studio Recording at Home; Part Deux


This tip, continuing the series of Home Studio Recording, focuses on the hardest part of accomplishing this feat: Drums.

A big sound killer on 'budget' recordings is poorly recorded drums. There is a remedy, though. If you have one set of drum mics, buy another (or borrow. This will come into play later, though).

If you have clips that hold them on the drums, great. With the two sets, you'll only use half of the clips. For the rest of the mics, you'll want stands. You'll need one stand for each drum, plus six.

The dual mics serve this purpose: To capture the sound of the whole drum. One mic for the batter head (the side you hit), and one for the resonator (the side you don't).

For the batter head, you'll use the mic clips, and attach the mics as you normally would during playing. For the resonator head, use the stands to position the mic directly across the drum, making a straight line from the top of the drum to the bottom. This will help eliminate any voicing differences, which can be a real headache.

For the bass drum, you'll need 2 stands. Position the batter head mic close to the edge of the head on whatever side is easiest to access, but is also comfortable for your playing style.

Aim the mic so that it is pointed at a midway point between the center of the head and the edge. You can experiment with different spots, but be sure to NEVER let the mic be directly in front of the head.
For the bass resonator head (the front one that everybody sees), position the mic so that it is a mirror image of the batter mic. Once again, this gets rid of voicing problems.

You have just miked your drum kit, but what about cymbals? That's where the other 4 mics and stands come into play. Those 4 will take care of:

Hi-hats

Ride

Overheads

For the hi-hats, you'll want to position the mic about 3-5 inches from the top, and 2-4 inches from the side. It's best to come in from the outside of the kit, so that you'll pick up a bit of ambiance (the rest of the kit, as well as some natural reverb). Point the mic at a point close to midway between the bell and edge of the hats. Too close to the edge, and you'll get a sound similar to banging trash can lids together. Too close to the bell, and there's too much high-mid noise that CANNOT be reduced with an EQ.

For the ride, follow the same instructions for the hi-hats, but add about 2 inches to the distances. Aim the mic a little closer to the center as well, so that the mic will pick up any bell hits. A good spot is 1/4 the distance between the bell and edge.

Now for overheads. These are the mics that not only record the cymbals, but pick up the most ambiance.

NOTICE: I haven't already mentioned it, but you do NOT want to record with the drum kit up against a wall, nor do you want it in the center of the room. For best results, use the midway rule (as with placing mics on drums and cymbals, place the kit midway between the center of the room and the edge, preferably headed towards a corner). This will reduce unwanted echoes in the room due to sound reflection.

You will want to place the overheads about 1.5 feet above the highest cymbal. Space them out so that the entire kit is between them, but be sure to keep them evenly spaced. You'll want to use the snare as a midway marker for the placement of overhead mics, since it is your loudest drum, and more likely to be picked up in the overheads than any other drum. This will also keep the snare panned center (you'll be panning the drums out to the left and right later on the mixer, but the snare and bass stay center).

These are some guidelines for setting up mics for recording drums at home. I hope that helps, and stay tuned for Part Trés of Home Studio Recording.

on Mar 13, 2011 | Music

1 Answer

Peavey Valveking head strange feedback.


Sounds like one of your tubes going bad and becoming microphonic...


Google "Microphonic Tube" for additional info.

Oct 25, 2012 | Peavey Valveking Vk100 Guitar Head

1 Answer

I have the Simmons SD7PK. It sounds as though the speakers to my amp or through our PA system are busted. What could be causing this?


First thing is to verify your sound system is OK by running program material such as a CD at normal levels through it. If it is OK then you need to consider if your drum set is overdriving your sound system. Drums generate high pulses and can easily saturate PA systems. First thing here is to connect headphones to your drum set and listen how the set sounds via headphones. If both these tests pass muster, then your PA system may be too small to handle the drum audio. In that case, get at least a 15 inch powered monitor, preferably bi-amped to run the drums through.

Mar 07, 2011 | Simmons SD7PK Electronic Drum Set

1 Answer

I have a Gallien Krueger Backline 600 head rigged to a GK Blackloine 410 BLX-II cab. There is a crackle sound emitting from all the speakers, so I'm guessing there is something wrong with the head. Have...


i) If the crackle is there with all input signal cables removed, then likely to be the head.

ii) Does the crackle vary noisily with control settings? If so, move noisy control to & fro about 10 times to wipe any dirt from internals (temporary solution).

iii) If ii) is not a problem, then tap head casing to check whether a dry solder joint or poor internal connection is the cause. Was unit dropped?

iv) If none of the above, then suspect possible component breakdown.

Jan 24, 2011 | GallienKrueger Gallien Krueger Backline...

1 Answer

My tiny terror sounds the same volume when switchin between 7 or 15 watt settings


Well, the thing to shift between those is more of a marketing ploy than a useful function. The difference from 7 to 15 is ONLY 3 Db... which is about the minimum step one can hear in sound level... The amp might be able to deliver more power at the 15 setting than it can at the 7, but you have to crank it up to do it...

Dec 23, 2010 | Orange Amps Orange Tiny Terror 15 Watt...

2 Answers

Marshall MG100HDFX 100-Watt Amplifier Head. The head phone jack works but speaker output is dead. Hooked it to speakers with another amp input and after word it stopped working. Can't see any overheated...


You'll have to take it in to get it repaired. From what you described it sounds like you blew the output stage out. You can't run from your speaker output jack into the input jack of another amp. You should go out of the recording out, line out, effects out or in the least case your headphone out. What happens usually is your output transformer short circuits due to a mismatch of impedances. It sounds like you still have a transformer though so you might have gotten lucky. You will need to take it in though. Sorry.

Nov 26, 2009 | Marshall MG100HDFX 100-Watt Amplifier Head

3 Answers

Casio CTK-671 No Sound


Try plugging in a set of head phones , if you get sound that way the input jack may be causeing the prob. try pulling it back an forth a few times, sometimes this will free up the head phone jack. I hope its that simple . May be some one will have another idea Good luck DFD please rate me TK U

Apr 09, 2009 | Casio Music

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