Question about Zhumell LOMO P-111 modular brightfield microscope with Free UPS Ground Microscope

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Why should the coarse focusing knob not be used when focusing with the higher-powered objective lenses

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There are two reasons. One reason is that when on high power you are working so close to the glass slide that it is easy to misjudge how much you are moving the specimen toward the lens that you can break a slide before you realize it. The coarse focus moves the stage with the specimen on it very fast and you only have a very very short distance within the focus plane before you run the objective lens into the slide.
Secondly, it is just harder to control the minute adjustments needed at the higher powers with the "coarse" focus knob. If you start at the low magnifications find what you want to concentrate on with the coarse focus knobs and then work your way up to the higher powers, you will have very little trouble moving to the fine focus controls at 40x and 100x while still having control of your image.

Posted on Dec 25, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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How to Spotting Scopes Work?


Spotting Scope is a type of telescope typically used for observing wild animals and birds. A spotting scope features more magnification than a conventional binocular but less than an astronomical telescope.
The utility of a spotting scope becomes most obvious when the identification of an animal going in a large herd is required. Figuring out a specific animal from other look-alike animals becomes easy with such a device. For digiscoping purposes, few things can beat the power of spotting scopes. It is possible by using binoculars or telescopes to take a closer look at birds or other animals, but if you want a precise view of your target animal, a spotting scope is preferable.
Spotting Scope Features Explained
  • Objective lens
    Objective lens, also known as the Front lens, determines the image quality at higher magnifications. The diameter of this lens ranges from 50-100mm in size. It is also called "Aperture" of the lens. It is wise to buy the highest size of the objective lens considering its weight. Larger lenses allow to pass more light and create more bright images. This means you will get higher image quality with the larger lenses.
  • Lens Coating
    Manufactures often apply the chemical coating, which is known as Lens Coating, on the lens to reduce noise and increase light transmission. They also offer "fully coated," "multi-coated" and "fully multi-coated" lens to improve image quality. The premium quality spotting scopes' lenses are multi-coated with multiple layers on the surface.
  • Focusing
    There are two types of focusing mechanism in the spotting scopes such as Helical and Knob focusers. The focusing characteristics determine how quickly you can focus on the object with maximum precision. Between these two options, the helical focuser is the finest option for birding as it can change magnification rapidly along with the movement of the bird. For hunting or spotting slower animals, Knob focuser is best as it gives you more precise information than the former one.
  • Eye relief
    The eyepiece remains at a little distance from the users' eyes. This distance is called the eye relief where the light rays transmitted from the object pass to enter into your pupil. The comfortable eye relief distance is about 15mm to see the full field view. This feature is very important for those who wear eyeglasses. Nowadays, manufacturers are offering long eye relief for those who need to wear eyeglasses for convenient viewing.
  • Image Quality
    You might have seen some designation on the glass label of the spotting scope such ED glass, APO glass, HD glass, Fluorite glass. These special qualities of glass will cost you more but create a huge difference in image quality comparing low-quality lenses. Remember, you must pay for the good quality images when it comes to buying any types of optical instruments.
  • Magnification
    The magnification of spotting scope is higher than standard binoculars and varies between 15x to 75x. The power of the eyepiece determines the magnification of the scope. The important fact you should know that image quality drops off as the magnification goes up. Even premium quality scopes also lose a little quality at the highest magnification.
The condition of the atmosphere has effects on birding, hunting and digiscoping too. Humidity, ever-moving air, dry climates, dust and so on hinders the magnification and image quality at large.

Apr 08, 2018 | Optics

1 Answer

How to set up the lense


First thing to do is align the finder with the telescope. Do this during the day. Point on a feature at least 100 yards outside and center the finder on it. Next, use your lowest power eyepiece (25mm) and focus on the object. If the scope is not on the object, move the scope until the object is centered. Now adjust the finder so it is centered on what you see in the scope.
At night, let the scope cool down before you start using it. The best way to start is to find the moon. Practice on the moon until you feel comfortable Do not use the barlow until you get good. Always use the 25mm before you use higher power eyepieces, it makes it easier to center the object

Dec 21, 2011 | Optics

1 Answer

Science tech 262 manual


Can't find a manual. This is a 76mm reflector on a Alt/AZ mount.
1. During the day, put in the 20mm eyepiece and point to a object around 100 yards away.
2. Focus on the object
3. Align the finder to the object in the eyepiece
4, Set up at night, give the scope time to reach outside temperature
5. Point scope with finder at the moon. (More than half full will be too bright)
6 Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) and focus on the moon.
7. You may now use higher power eyepieces to observe.
8. Pointing the scope usually involves loosing 2 knobs to move the scope in up/down and side to side motion. There may be slow motion controls to adjust the scope as objects in the sky move.

Nov 27, 2011 | Optics

1 Answer

I cant see through eye piece . i can see thrugh until i put a lense in it? then its just black? but if i take lense out ans aim telescope i can see then i dut lense in and it goes black again


Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. Go outside during the day time and practice focusing on a distant object. TURN THE FOCUS KNOB until the image comes into focus.

If your scope is similar to the one in the picture above the FOCUSER end is the UP end of the tube--

See my tips on my profile page.

Feb 06, 2011 | Tasco 49114900 (114 x 900mm) Telescope

1 Answer

After focusing it drifts out of focus. The knobs do not stay in the same place


There is a tension adjustment just inside the coarse focus knob. (same side as the switch) It looks like a chrome ring with 2 or 3 holes in it. You may have an odd looking tool that came with your microscope that is used to make this adjustment. Tighten it just a bit until the stage stops falling. You don't want it too tight or it will begin to make it difficult to adjust your coarse focus.

Dec 01, 2010 | National Optical 131 Monocular Microscope

1 Answer

The stage slides down on its own and the view gets out of focus.


Just inside the coarse focus knob you will see a "chrome" ring with holes it it. That ring needs to be tightened just a bit. It will make the coarse focus knob stiffer so tighten only enough to stop the downward drift of the stage. A funny looking tool should have come with the scope. It is used to adjust this "tension" ring.

Oct 22, 2010 | Swift M2251C Monocular Microscope

1 Answer

The focus knobs drift


Just inside the coarse focus knob you will see a "chrome" ring with holes it it. That ring needs to be tightened just a bit. It will make the coarse focus knob stiffer so tighten only enough to stop the downward drift of the stage. A funny looking tool should have come with the scope. It is used to adjust this "tension" ring.

Oct 13, 2010 | National Optical 138-MS Monocular...

1 Answer

Stage slides down after focusing


There is a tension adjustment for this. It is located on the coarse focus knob which is on the same side as the switch. It looks like a chrome ring with about 3 holes in it. A strange looking tool should have come with the scope. It is designed to fit into these holes and allow you to adjust the tension on the coarse focus knob. You need to tighten it just a little bit. Not too much or you will have trouble operating the coarse focus knobs smoothly.

Jul 08, 2010 | Swift M2251C Monocular Microscope

2 Answers

My microscope drfits out of focus, how can I fix this?


The problem is that the stage is heavy and the adjustment screws are loose. You need to tighten the coarse adjustment knob screws in order to create more friction so that the stage stays put. That, or don't adjust anything and keep holding on to the coarse adjustment while you're using it.

Nov 19, 2009 | Boreal WW3111900 Microscope

1 Answer

Focusing Issue


The screws should be short enough not to stop the primary's travel, but pull them out and try it again. Good luck! George.

Jun 25, 2008 | Celestron NexStar 11 GPS (660 x 279mm)...

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