Canon Cameras - Recent Questions, Troubleshooting & Support


You need the wireless adapter for this, you cannot do this with the camera.

Canon EOS 5D... | Answered on Dec 03, 2019


First of all, do not save any new file to camera's memory card.

Take out memory card, and connect it to computer using a card reader. You should see memory card shown as a drive letter (like H:) in Windows Explorer.
Download this camera photo recovery software
http://www.asoftech.com/apr/
Install and open the photo recovery software, select the memory card, and click 'Start' button.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 27, 2019


Possible that the mic within the camera is bad or there is obstruction to the mic. Please check and clean any dirt , place the camera and shoot without holding to confirm if the sound is better or not.

Canon PowerShot ... | Answered on Nov 27, 2019


i dont think this will help but i have a kodak digital camera and when i do video i get no sound when i play it back. if you plug it into computer to download pics and video there will be sound with the video. thats how mine works anyway.. good luck..

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 27, 2019


Check your settings in the menus. If you've muted the camera to remove the other sounds, it will mute the video soundtrack as well.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 27, 2019


clean the lens,get it serviced the lens as well as CCD.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 27, 2019


I bought a new damn camera.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 27, 2019


On the 5D error code 30 appears to be shutter related and general advice is to get a professional repair or send it back to Canon.

Canon EOS 5D... | Answered on Nov 13, 2019


H264 is a "mov." file. Windows media player11 and Power DVD 9 do not support this type of file. If you don't like QuickTime, there are many free media players that will support it (VLC is a good one). You could convert the mov. file to an avi. file with a video converter program. Then your avi. format movie will play in WMP

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 08, 2019


NEEDS BATTERY

Canon Cameras | Answered on Nov 08, 2019


I think it is due to the extensive choice of quality lenses.

Canon Cameras | Answered on Nov 05, 2019


Contact Canon directly to inquire.

Canon Cameras | Answered on Oct 26, 2019


The date/time cannot be deleted once it is embedded in the image. To turn off the date/time deselect the date/time stamping by following procedure:
These instructions explain how to insert the date in images.
attention:
  • The [Date Stamp] cannot be deleted from the image data once it has been recorded because the date is written in as an image.
  • When selecting [Date Stamp] , [Recording Pixels] is set to 1600 x 1200 pixels and the compression (image quality) to [Fine].
  • When the shooting mode is set to <Movie> (g0029623.gif), settings for inserting the date and time cannot be made.
  • The following explanations are provided based on the assumption that the [Shooting Mode] is set to <Program AE> (g0034813.gif).



1. Press the <Power> button on the camera.
g0046584.gif
2. Press the <FUNC./SET> (g0046915.gif) button.
g0046627.gif
3. A screen like the one below will appear on the monitor.
g0046619.gif
Select g0013174.gif [Date Stamp] (g0013171.gif) in the [Recording Pixels] section g0013173.gif.
g0013176.gif Press the <MENU> (g0046624.gif) button.


4. A screen like the one below will appear on the monitor.
g0046699.gif
g0013173.gif Operate the <directional buttons> left or right to select [Date Stamp] and set it to [Date] or [Date & Time].
g0013174.gif Press the <MENU> (g0046624.gif) button.


5. Press the <FUNC./SET> (g0046915.gif) button.
g0046628.gif
6. Make sure that the [Date Stamp] is set and the following screen will appear with the icon (g0013164.gif) in the lower-left corner of the screen.
g0046623.gif
7. When shooting with this setting, the date will be embedded in the image as shown below.
g0018302.gif
g0013173.gif [Date]
g0013174.gif [Date & Time]
warning: The date, its font and color, and the position where it is displayed cannot be changed. Also, dates and times recorded with [Date Stamp] cannot be deleted.


If you need a manual for the A480, you can download it from:

http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelInfoAct&tabact=DownloadDetailTabAct&fcategoryid=320&modelid=18155

Please rate this solution. Thanks.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 20, 2019


look into the camera with a bright light and see if any pins are bent where the memory card goes in. also check to see if the card is unlocked and check the card to see if it works in another device.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 19, 2019


First, to answer your lens question, 400mm is unlikely to be adequate. On a digital camera this is going to give only 6x magnification. Some nature subjects will require much more than that.

Also, do not need a fully featured 'pro' camera. These have features which you may not want. Look at lenses first, and let that dictate the camera.

It rather depends on your intended subject matter, but in general for nature photography (I presume you are thinking of vertebrate animals, rather than plants or insects.) you require very long focal length lenses. This is because wild animals are very difficult to approach, and many are comparatively small as well. As an example, you may only be able to get within 30ft of a heron however well you are hidden, and for a bird that size at that distance a 400mm lens will just be big enough. Just.

As a rule you want to fill the frame. So to work out what focal length you need you need to work out the size of the image in the camera. This is not difficult to work out, as the magnification is only the ratio of the subject to lens distance to the (Thoeretical) film/sensor to lens distance. (Most long lenses are physically shorter than their theoretical focal length. That's the true origin of the word 'telephoto', the lens is optically 'telescoped' into a shorter package.)

In reality this varies a little as the lens moves in and out to focus it, but in practice you just use the focal length of the lens. So for out Heron which is about 10,000mm away with a 400mm lens the magnification is 400/10,000 = 4/100 =.04. A heron is about .5m tall (18inches roughly), and 500mm x 0.05 = 20mm. The hieght of a digital sensor is about 16mm, so that's full height, but a heron is a tall bird, so portrait mode might be better, and that will be closer to 24mm.

So in our example, a 400mm lens will do but only for an animal half a meter in size, if you can get thirty feet away. And that's pushing your luck. (The nearest I ever got to a heron without sitting all day in a hide hoping for it to show was twice that distance!)

Most subjects will be smaller, or further away. Getting within 150ft of a deer in clear view is quite a challenge even for an expert stalker. At 1.5m tall with a 400mm lens, the image will be 12mm high. If the subject is a grizzly bear, then I doubt you would want to be that close.

Of course if you are wanting to photograph smaller animals, then the problem is compounded. Especially if they are easily spooked.

In essence you want as long a lens as you can manage, so you can photograph from a comfortable (for the amimal) and safe (grizzly bear) distance. However, as in many instances you won't be able to control that, and the range of animals you want to photograph will vary in size, you really want either more than one lens, or a really good zoom.

Really good zooms of long focal length are very expensive, so two lenses might be a better option, or a long lens with a factory matched multiplier would be almost as good. (Zoom lenses cannot perform at optimum over all the focal lengths available, so really good ones are difficult to design and make.)

So you first need to decide what focal lengths you need.

Then you have to consider camera shake. As a rule of thumb you need an absolute minumum shutter speed of 1/(focal length in mm) for hand-held shots. As you will be using long lenses, with small apertures, you won't be able to take shots hand held.

One (partial) solution is to use an image stabilized or shake reduced system.

Image stabilization is built into the lens, and works by moving optical elements to compensate for vibrations. This makes the lenses much more expensive, and will eat batteries. This has the advantage that it is always optimal for the lens.

Shake reduction moves the sensor in the camera, to achieve the same effect. It makes the camera a little more expensive, but the lenses are a lot cheaper, and that's where most of your money will go!

(Note, that digital image shake compensation is not the same thing, and reduces the image sharpness.)

Of course the traditional solution is a really sturdy tripod. Most tripods are simply not up to the job, so you need to check out as many reviews as you can. But be aware a really good tripod will not be cheap.

The camera mount must be really rigid if the camera is not to move during exposure (A camera with a mirror-up function can help. The mirror is the Major source of vibration in a camera, this allows the mirror to flip well before the shutter fires allowing time for vibration to die away.) and the tripod itself must not flex or twist.

A tripod with the means of suspending a weight underneath is useful, extra weight will make sure the tripod feet are firmly placed and help pre-stress the tripod so any residual 'slack' is taken up. (A simple hook that you can hang a kit-bag on will suffice!)

A good tripod and head could cost £200 or more alone!

As for selecting the lenses....

Canon do some very long focal length lenses but they are also very expensive (£2000+) These include a zoom with image stabilization, and a dedicated multiplier to double the range. A good used example will cost over £1000.

However, you should be aware that Canon are generally quite expensive, and other manufacturers produce similar systems, at various prices. I would look at Nikon, and Pentax, these brands are still well regarded.

Canon EF... | Answered on Oct 11, 2019


Hi.

Test using a different battery. When it does like that it is often the battery shorted inside. If the problem occurs using a known-good battery, then the contacts in the battery slots or the circuits behind the contacts have a short. When there is no battery the shorted wires or contacts are not "hot" and the short does not prevent the camera from starting.
If the problem is not the battery the camera must be disassembled. In that case disassembling will start from the screws on right hand side (watching from front), then screws in front, then left and back. Unless you have done similar repairs before it is advisable not attempting to disassemble the camera. The camera is very easy to damage. There are springs, wires and tricky parts near to shutter button on top, selector wheel and strap holder. If problem is camera and not the battery you can get a good quote on repair here:Repair.

Regards.

Ginko

Canon EOS... | Answered on Oct 10, 2019


Try some photo recovery software to rescue the files on your digital camera memory card, here are some for your options.

Photo Recovery (for Windows)
Photo Recovery for Mac

Be careful: Before your pictures are recovered, do not attempt to save more files to the card in case the original files(your pictures) are overwritten.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 09, 2019

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